MARADONA or MESSI?

June 30, 2021 – 8:05 am

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Remembering a godlike football genius. By Cesar Chelala.

It is already several months since Diego Maradona died [November 25, 2020; at the age of 60], and the world continues to talk about him. I believe that few sports idols brought as much happiness to the world as Maradona did. Perhaps only in the United States, where soccer is not yet as popular as in other countries, Maradona is not as widely known. But the rest of the world renders homage to his memory as a player.

I remember once I was traveling in several Asian countries on a United Nations health mission. When I was leaving Bangladesh, I was asked by the customs officer for a money declaration form. I told him that nobody had given me any form to fill. He looked sternly at me and said, “You foreigners are all the same. You come to this country and don’t want to follow the rules!” I was disconcerted, fearing that I wouldn’t be able to continue with my mission. Suddenly he yelled at me, “Where are you from?” “Argentina,” I said. “Oh, Maradona’s country,” he said, “Just continue, don’t’ worry.”

For Maradona, the ‘Hand of God’ goal was revenge after Argentina’s defeat by the British in the Malvinas/Falklands war. Talking later about that goal he declared, “Not even the photographers managed to capture what really happened. And Shilton, [the British goalkeeper] jumping with his eyes shut, was outraged! I like this goal. I felt I was pick- pocketing the English.”

Even now, the controversy continues. Who is a better player, Messi now or Maradona then? To answer that question, it might be useful to seek help from a Greek oracle, since both are, or were, in Maradona’s case, exquisite players.

Maradona came from the humblest of homes to become the most talked about soccer player of his generation. His two goals against the British team in the World Cup in Mexico City are now legendary. The first, the famous (or, more properly infamous since it was scored with the help of his hand) became the now iconic “Hand of God” goal.

For Maradona, it was revenge after Argentina’s defeat by the British in the Malvinas/Falklands war. Talking later about that goal he declared, “Not even the photographers managed to capture what really happened. And Shilton, [the British goalkeeper] jumping with his eyes shut, was outraged! I like this goal. I felt I was pick- pocketing the English.”

Maradona even has a religious movement named after him called The Church of Maradona.

His second goal, however, after he dribbled several opponents - including the goalkeeper - was considered by the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) the best goal of the century. In my native Argentina, Maradona was worshipped, at least until he became the coach of the Argentine team in the last World Cup where Argentina lost to Germany in a dreadful performance.

Both Lionel Messi and Maradona share similar ways of playing. A great speed, a wonderful dribbling ability as well as the capacity to send the ball to the best placed team mate. What is evident in Maradona, however, is his street urchin savvy. An Italian friend told me that when Maradona was playing for Napoli, during a game, while holding the ball he feigned that he was going to fall forward.

On seeing this, those from the opposing team that were closing on him moved slightly aside. What Maradona was doing, instead, was trying to see who was the best placed among his companions, sent him the ball and it was easy for his team mate to score. According to my friend, the Napoli fans went crazy with enthusiasm and for two solid minutes applauded and cheered Maradona.

In Napoli, Maradona is as revered as in Argentina and portraits of him are placed in many places in the city as if he were a saint, even placing candles under his figure. The Napoli soccer team never won as many championships as when Maradona was playing for it.

Maradona even has a religious movement named after him called The Church of Maradona.

It is perhaps in their personal characteristics where one can find the real differences between them. While Messi is quiet, Maradona is boastful. While Maradona was a fighter against the world, Messi seems to be a naturally timid, even modest person. While Maradona was addicted to drugs, Messi is a very clean player, with a very normal lifestyle.

Cesar Luis Menotti, who managed the Argentine team that won the 1978 World Cup, thus defined Maradona’s talent, “I am always cautious about using the word ‘genius’… The beauty of Diego’s game has a hereditary element - his natural ease with the ball - but it also owes a lot to his ability to learn: a lot of those brushstrokes, those strokes of ‘genius’, are in fact a product of his hard work. Diego worked hard to be the best.”

The physical characteristics of both players are similar; they are both short, sturdy, and have a demoniacal speed which allows them to easily overcome their opponents. Maradona’s goal of the century against the British team was rivaled, even in its minor details, by a wonderful goal Messi scored against the Spanish team Getafe in 2007. Although, as some fans of both players said at the time, “It is not the same thing to score against the British than against Getafe…”

But it is perhaps in their personal characteristics where one can find the real differences between them. While Messi is quiet, Maradona is boastful. While Maradona was a fighter against the world, Messi seems to be a naturally timid, even modest person. While Maradona was addicted to drugs, Messi is a very clean player, with a very normal lifestyle.

They are both strategists and team players, and they are both highly technical with the ball, which seems attached with Velcro to their feet, only to be shot with devastating force when circumstances are favorable. Messi, however, never was a team leader in the same way than Maradona was. Who is the best, Messi or Maradona? To make a comparison is perhaps not fair. They are both equally talented, each one a great player and both of them a glory to the game.

Note: Dr Cesar Chelala is a co-winner of the 1979 Overseas Press Club of America award for the article “Missing or Disappeared in Argentina: The Desperate Search for Thousands of Abducted Victims.” The above article was posted at CounterPunch.

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SEVEN MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS CHARGED IN DEATH OF DIEGO MARADONA

BUENOS AIRES - Seven medical professionals have been charged with “simple homicide with eventual intent” in the death of Diego Maradona, ESPN reported May 20, 2021. The prosecutor’s office in San Isidro, Argentina, which opened an investigation into the Argentine legend’s death, have requested to the judge that those individuals indicted not be permitted to leave the country. If found guilty, those accused could face between eight to 25 years in prison. Maradona died at the age of 60 on November 25, 2020, from heart failure, two weeks after undergoing brain surgery.

Leopoldo Luque, the neurosurgeon who performed a successful brain operation on Maradona, and psychiatrist Agustina Cosachov, who treated the former Napoli star, are among the seven individuals charged. The two have denied any wrongdoing. Audio of private conversations between doctors and people from Maradona’s entourage were leaked to the media and have indicated that Maradona was not being properly looked after prior to his death.

Maradona’s family has demanded justice and holds Luque among those responsible for his death.

Read the rest of the article here.

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  1. 3 Responses to “MARADONA or MESSI?”

  2. No one gives a shit about this.

    By DD on Jul 2, 2021

  3. He will always be remembered for CHEATING and being a bigheaded shrimpdick.
    Falklands war was arranged by the Argentina/British elite, like all wars, for profit, divide and conquer and to keep the masses from the money trail, like the covid19 hoax.

    By j.barlow on Jul 3, 2021

  4. STFU jackoff.barlow. Suck my bigheaded shrimpdick you homo.

    By Derrick on Jul 3, 2021

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