JAMES COTTON R.I.P. 1935 - 2017

March 17, 2017 – 9:20 am

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JAMES COTTON R.I.P. 1935 - 2017

Blues harmonica virtuoso and onetime Muddy Waters sideman James Cotton died on March 16, 2017 at a medical center in Austin of pneumonia. A rep for the musician confirmed his death. The 81-year-old earlier overcame a bout with throat cancer in the ’90s, before recording a final star-studded album that included Gregg Allman, Chuck Leavell and Warren Haynes. As a child, he’d become obsessed with harmonica player Sonny Boy Williamson II’s King Biscuit Time broadcasts and, at age nine, moved in with the elder harpist to learn the instrument. He launched his own career as a teenager and toured with both Williamson and Howlin’ Wolf. At age 20, he began touring and recording with Waters and is featured on that artist’s At Newport LP (1960), most notably “Got My Mojo Working.” Cotton, dubbed “Mr. Superharp,” formed the James Cotton Band in 1966; and would go on to explore blues-rock with performances with Janis Joplin, the Grateful Dead, Led Zeppelin, BB King, Santana, Little Feat and Freddie King, among others. - Rolling Stone/ultimateclassicrock

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JAMES COTTON
Montreux 1995 [no label, 1CD]

Live at the Montreux-Swiss Stravinsky Hall, Montreux, Switzerland; July 17, 1995. Very good FM broadcast. Plus bonus FM tracks from the ’80s.

Thanks to LETSGO for sharing the show at Dime.

LETSGO noted:

The Montreux show is from an Europe1 broadcast (tracks 01-08). Bonus are from France Inter broadcasts (tracks 09-12).

Lineage:
FM from a Dual tuner, recorded on cassettes, Marantz SD 4051 deck, Zoom H4, SD card, PC, Audacity (volume, tracks), FLAC 8 (TLH)

Click on the highlighted tracks to download the MP3s (320 kbps). As far as we can ascertain, these tracks have never been officially released on CD.

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Track 01. Band Instrumental 6:04
Track 02. Band intro by DJ 0:17
Track 03. I Can’t Stand The Rain 4:31
Track 04. James Cotton introduction and instrumental 3:49
Track 05. Untitled 6:40
Track 06. You Don’t Have To Go 6:33
Track 07. Hoochie Coochie Man 3:42
32 mins

Lineup:
James Cotton - harmonica and (broken) vocals
Anthony Thomas Paice (?) - piano
Michael Ellis Morrison - bass
R Lee McFarland - guitar
Brian Jones - drums

Track 08. Stormy Monday (Nice, France; July 1988) 7:00
Track 09. Hot And Cold (Paris, France; October 21, 1988) 3:33
Track 10. Sunny Road (Paris, France; October 21, 1988) 4:52
Track 11. Turn On Your Lovelight (Nice, France; July 18, 1989) 4:17
Total: 52 mins

Click here to order James Cotton releases.

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  1. 9 Responses to “JAMES COTTON R.I.P. 1935 - 2017”

  2. huge loss to the blues world..not too many of the old guys left to carry on..thanks for acknowledging him Big O. I was very fortunate to meet the man once and he was humble and gracious…

    By sluggo on Mar 17, 2017

  3. I got to see him a thousand years ago in a tiny town in upstate New York. It was a small club, and he was great. A

    By Rick on Mar 17, 2017

  4. I got to see him a thousand years ago in a tiny town in upstate New York. It was a small club, and he was great. An intimate show, and he had a one-armed drummer. (Anybody can find out who that was, 1979 or 1980?)

    By Matchstick Frankie on Mar 17, 2017

  5. I got to see him a thousand years ago in a tiny town in upstate new York. It was a small club, and he was grea

    By George on Mar 17, 2017

  6. Fav Cotton lp - Live And On The Move. Check it out. Fav live show - June 87 Chicago Blues Fest with Elvin Bishop an Nick Gravenites. Sure glad i taped 8 years of Chicago Blues Festivals! Thank you WBGO-FM and thank you James Cotton-RIP.

    By Rich on Mar 18, 2017

  7. @Rich:
    I used to live across the street from Biddy Mulligan’s and saw Mr. Cotton there more than once. Always a great time. Albert King, Buddy Guy, Son Seals, everybody played Biddy’s and I could always get there early to get a seat at a barrel or the bar.

    By kingpossum on Mar 18, 2017

  8. I tried to see him a thousand years ago in a tiny town in upstate new York at a small club. It wasn’t to be…

    By Otis on Mar 18, 2017

  9. I got to see him a thousand years ago in a tiny town in upstate New York. It was a small club, and he was great. A

    By Rick on Mar 17, 2017
    I got to see him a thousand years ago in a tiny town in upstate New York. It was a small club, and he was great. An intimate show, and he had a one-armed drummer. (Anybody can find out who that was, 1979 or 1980?)

    By Matchstick Frankie on Mar 17, 2017
    I got to see him a thousand years ago in a tiny town in upstate new York. It was a small club, and he was grea

    By George on Mar 17, 2017

    Who the fuck are you ? Make up your mind … MORON !!!

    By Matchstick Moron on Mar 19, 2017

  10. I saw James Cotton in 1968 or maybe 69 at a club in Sacramento called the Sound Factory. Ranks in top 10 most inspirational concerts of my life. The band came out and played 2 instrumentals and were on fire, had the audience on their feet, then James Cotton joined and the night exploded. Amazing singing, incredible harmonica tone - and what a showman. I believe the lead guitarist was Luther Tucker and he was the best guitarist in the world for about 90 minutes that night in Sacramento. I saw James Cotton a couple other times but that show was special.

    By Stephen Clayton on Apr 6, 2017

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